Plant-based seafood options are the newest industry development, meaning you can wave goodbye to lousy alternatives. Instead, an ever-growing plethora of products are slowly but surely replacing meat across supermarkets, restaurants and homes across the world. Swap out conventional sausages or burgers at your summer barbecue and enjoy “raw” fish, “tuna” salad or even golden […]

Try these 4 Plant-Based Seafood Brands

Plant-based seafood options are the newest industry development, meaning you can wave goodbye to lousy alternatives. Instead, an ever-growing plethora of products are slowly but surely replacing meat across supermarkets, restaurants and homes across the world. Swap out conventional sausages or burgers at your summer barbecue and enjoy “raw” fish, “tuna” salad or even golden “fish” and chips. These innovative companies have shifted the narrative to offer new plant-based seafood products.

Plant-Based Seafood Brands to Look Out for

Good Catch®

Good Catch has crafted its “6-Plant Protein Blend” out of chickpea flour, navy bean powder and a range of pea, soy, faba bean and lentil protein. Its frozen entrees and appetizers offer up to 21g of protein in styles like a classic-style fish burger, fingers or crab cakes—a notable figure when compared to its plant-based burger which contains an average of 25g of protein per 100g of white fish.

New Wave Foods

Seaweed is a unique base in New Wave Food’s faux shrimp that can be cooked in any style (just like those out the sea), whether it be grilling, frying or baking, proving how versatile plant-based products can be. 

Its gluten-free recipe also contains no cholesterol and zero trans fats, adding sustainability and nutritional motives for switching to these greener options. Both New Wave Foods and Good Catch are available to buy at retailers like Whole Foods and Walmart across the States. 

Sophie’s Kitchen

Conveniently packaged in cans, Sophie’s Kitchen has changed the game for pantry staples that can turn into quick meals whilst being full of protein to keep you feeling satisfied. One can of its sea salt or black pepper “toona” only has 240 calories and an impressive 20g of protein compared to an average 42g for standard tuna servings.

Made out of pea protein, this non-GMO plant-based alternative can be used to bulk up sandwiches, salads, wraps, pasta dishes and so much more. Due to its long shelf life, Sophie’s Kitchen “toona” is available across the US on multiple online retailers like Walmart and Amazon, as well as bespoke vegetarian-focused platforms in the UK and Australia. 

OmniFoods

We know what you’re thinking; fake fish can’t taste good. OmniFoods, a Hong Kong-based company, can prove otherwise with its pivotal collaborations with major international chains like McDonald’s and Starbucks. Incorporating a golden fillet into a tasty ciabatta sandwich and crab cakes into a salad, Starbucks provided the public with a fast and easy substitute. 

Cooking its retail fish-less fish at home proves just as easy; simply cook from frozen in a pan or air-fryer—which is my household’s favourite method. 

It was surprising how flakey the substitute was: light in body yet with a satisfying texture from the battered edge that had the perfect crisp when cooked in the air-fryer. Although the taste wasn’t comparable to freshly caught fish, its more subtle flavour brought back memories of what fish should taste like without being too overwhelming. This can be a big advantage for vegetarians or vegans who aren’t fans of the overly “fishy” taste of real seafood. 

Although founded in Hong Kong, Omnifoods is available in restaurants around the world as well as retailers like British Ocado, Australian Woolworth and American Whole Foods. 

When thinking of how to incorporate plant-based alternatives into plant-based diets, there is a magnitude of recipes and dishes that can be made. The diverse range of products can be implemented into both healthy and more indulgent meals. Imagine a summer barbecue that doesn’t have any animal cruelty, but instead a feast of “salmon” burgers on the grill and salads topped with “tuna” or “prawns”. 

These innovative companies mean that kids can experience everyday staples like fish fingers or fish and chips by experimenting with vegetarian replacements. If you’re heading to a potluck, why not make an appetiser plate of crab cakes and grilled prawn skewers with chunky vegetables? The opportunities are endless and it’s time to get creative. 

This article was written by Amber Lai.

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